• M&T Podcast 07 – “The Creation of Issue Four”
      We recorded a new podcast episode this morning which can be listened to above. Because Mike and I just finished Issue Four, we dedicated this episode to discussing what it’s like to produce the magazine, what’s featured in this new issue, and what to expect in the coming weeks. You can subscribe to our Podcast on iTunesStitcher, or Soundcloud.   Notable links from this podcast: Our new “Cutting Edge Technology” T-shirt "5 Tips for Writing Well" Issue Four Issue Three ... read more
    Source: Mortise & tenon magazinePublished on 2018-02-24
  • From the Ground Up
    I was in elementary school when my father hurt his back so badly while working on the farm that his doctor confined him to bed. My bedroom was immediately down the hall from my parents’, and after school one day I heard disturbing noises – violent banging and rasping – coming from their room. The door was open a crack, and as I gently pushed my way in, I was surprised, relieved and completely enlightened about my own nature. ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-02-23
  • Updates to the ‘Ingenious Mechanicks’ PDF
    Several customers have asked why they are receiving emails from our store notifying them that there is an updated pdf of “Ingenious Mechanics” ready for download. Is this a scam? A mailserver error? Did chipmunks chew a CAT5 cable? No. There’s a new pdf available for you to download. When we make updates to the pdfs that we sell on our site, we ask our software to notify all existing customers that a new version is available. There have been ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-02-23
  • News: It is Time to Buy Hardware
    After the death of Nancy Cogger of Londonderry Brasses, Horton Brasses acquired the company’s stock and is selling many existing pieces at 50 percent off. Orion Henderson estimated there are more than 23,000 pieces of Londonderry hardware now for sale on the Horton site. If this is all the information you need, get your credit card out and load up. Here’s the link. I swooped in and bought about 50 […] The post News: It is Time to Buy Hardware ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2018-02-23
  • News: It is Time to Buy Hardware
    After the death of Nancy Cogger of Londonderry Brasses, Horton Brasses acquired the company’s stock and is selling many existing pieces at 50 percent off. Orion Henderson estimated there are more than 23,000 pieces of Londonderry hardware now for sale on the Horton site. If this is all the information you need, get your credit card out and load up. Here’s the link. I swooped in and bought about 50 pieces of campaign hardware for future commissions and a ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-02-23
  • The Workbench Success Story
    In the last 10 hours 8,900 woodworkers have watched part 8 of making my workbench on YouTube alone. That of course does not include how many have watched the other 7 parts in the series. On woodworkingmasterclasses.com the series has been going out two weeks earlier. I am not sure how many have seen it […] Read the full post The Workbench Success Story on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2018-02-23
  • I Will Not Use FedEx As Long As They Support the NRA
    The title says it all. I could not look myself in the mirror in the mornings knowing I was supporting a company that funded a political organization providing tools for mass killers no matter how many good folks are members.Back to woodworking:Today I'm making legs for a small vernacular stool and have been reminded how much work there is to shaping Maple. Add in I seldom turn, my best guess it has been at least several years since the last ... read more
    Source: I’M A OK GUYPublished on 2018-02-23
  • A Kitchen Essential: The “Staked” Stool
    I don’t remember much of the furniture I grew up with, but one small piece stands out in my memory.  It was a small, oak footstool, which was kicked around my parents’ kitchen for years (sometimes literally).  I believe that it was made by some friends who were into woodworking at the time.  They made a batch of them to sell, and my parents bought one.  It’s survived several decades of heavy use in their house, so when I first ... read more
    Source: The Literary Workshop BlogPublished on 2018-02-23
  • Profound Truth
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2018-02-23
  • more tool cabinet stuff…….
    It is that time of the year where I don't know what to wear when I leave for work. This morning when I left for work the porch temp said 58°F (14.4°C). The weather prediction said the overnight temps would be in the 20's (obviously they weren't) and the 40's during day. What to do, what to do? I wore a light jacket and I survived. The temps dipped to 42°F (5.5°C) and that is the low limit for this ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2018-02-23
  • Music I’d Like To Hear #148
    Source: Doug BerchPublished on 2018-02-23
  • More on working white oak
    Bob Rozaieski has now followed up on his podcast response to my question with a detailed written post on techniques for working white oak with hand tools that I find very informative and useful.  Highly recommended.I don't have a lot to add to his suggestions.  In addition to keeping your planes very sharp, I have found a cabinet scraper to be particularly useful on white oak as a way of avoiding tearout.  I find that even a sharp plane will ... read more
    Source: Oregon Woodworker by Andy MargesonPublished on 2018-02-23
  • Divide and conquer…
    Now that the BBM is “mobile” around the shop, I was able to clear my bench and dry mounted the boring till in place. I wanted it to be in line with the top of the big plane cabinet on the other side of the window.  Measured and put a mark on the wall and window trim.In place and just resting on the mallets & hammer’s top on its rack, put it in, at just about the right height.  Maybe ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2018-02-22
  • How to Rivet Furniture Parts Together
    I built a folding bookstand (above) for an upcoming issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine that uses traditional copper rivets to join the components and allow them to pivot. After posting a few photos of the bookstand, a lot of people were curious about how to use copper rivets. So here is a quick tutorial – full details and measured drawings will be in the June 2018 issue of the magazine. […] The post How to Rivet Furniture Parts Together appeared ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2018-02-22
  • ‘Ingenious Mechanicks’ Chapter by Chapter
    Coming up with a title for “Ingenious Mechanicks: Early Workbenches & Workholding” was a challenge. This new book started as an expansion of “Roman Workbenches,” a small letterpress edition we published last year. But the more research that Suzanne Ellison and I did, the more we realized that the “Roman” part wasn’t quite right. I came up with 10 alternative titles, including such losers as “A Workbench Atlas” (too broad), “Workbenches: The First 1,500 Years” (yawn) and “Slabs, Legs ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-02-22
  • The Highland Woodturner: Repairing a Sanding Pad
    In the February issue of The Highland Woodturner, Curtis Turner offers an easy solution for repairing a sanding pad: I never looked closely at how the head was attached to the handle of my handheld sander. After inspecting, I felt I could repair or at least salvage something from this equipment failure. I could see it was a simple task to remove the sanding head. I didn’t have the ability to remake it in the same fashion, so I ... read more
    Source: Highland Woodworking BlogPublished on 2018-02-22
  • Jelly Side Down
    Accidentally drop that piece of toast with jelly. The probability of landing jelly side down seems to be 0.9944. And when a board is accidentally knocked out of the vise, what are the odds of it landing on a fragile corner? Right: 0.9944! That’s too much damage for the steam iron rescue. It took only a couple of hours to make a replacement. …and would have taken only a half-turn of the vise handle to prevent it in the first ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2018-02-22
  • Jelly Side Down
    Accidentally drop that piece of toast with jelly. The probability of landing jelly side down seems to be 0.9944. And when a board is accidentally knocked out of the vise, what are the odds of it landing on a fragile corner? Right: 0.9944! That’s too much damage for the steam iron rescue. It took only a couple of hours to make a replacement. …and would have taken only a half-turn of the vise handle to prevent it in the first ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2018-02-22
  • Cutting a Rug in SketchUp
    Recently, while doing an online SketchUp session with one of my students, he asked about creating components with irregular shapes. He was thinking of creating a rug component to use… ... read more
  • Making an Oud and a Baroque Lute
    Like most people, we spend lots of time (way too much time) surfing the web, entranced by various videos. In Video Roundup, we offer some videos from all over the world that we found especially intriguing.This weeks selections showcase the creation of two "exotic" instruments: an oud and a Baroque lute.Oud ConstructionBaroque Lute Construction ... read more
    Source: Video Roundup at Tools for Working WoodPublished on 2018-02-22
  • tool cabinet – fitting the fronts………
    Yesterday and today were in the low 60's F (16°C) and we tied the record for the highest temp set back in 1930. Tomorrow the temps are going to drop about 20 degrees and it'll be more seasonable.  My lilac bushes have started to bud and the daisies are putting up sprouts by the back door. I didn't catch Punxsutawney Phil  predication for spring but it's looking good from where I'm sitting.started with the bottom pull out frontAfter I installed ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2018-02-22
  • period carvings; arches/arcading: what-have-you
    That carving pattern I worked on the other day https://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2018/02/19/carved-arcading/ is very common, except in my work & my photo files! I have rarely used it, but that will change; I’m planning to take a whack at a few versions of it. Here’s what mine was generally based on, a walnut box, made c. 1600-1610. London? This is the drawer front to the box…I’d say maybe 4″ high. Look how much detail is crammed into a small space. arcadingThis one ... read more
    Source: Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notesPublished on 2018-02-22
  • 5 Tips for Writing Well
    During each issue’s editorial process, Mike, Jim, Megan, and I go round and round discussing better ways to articulate the ideas in our and our authors’ heads. We love word craft and always feel a sense of accomplishment when we polish each piece to clearly reflect the author’s voice and vision. Our authors come from many backgrounds and experiences. Many have been professional writers for years while others are just emerging onto the woodworking writer scene. Many of our ... read more
    Source: Mortise & tenon magazinePublished on 2018-02-21
  • With Saw, Plane and Chisel
    Hi guys, I've never made these publicly available, only by request or at in-person appearances. But I just got another case of books in the mail and thought I'd give you all a crack at it. Here is the writeup on the book provided by the publisher F&W. "With Saw, Plane & Chisel documents the hand-tool-only construction of six pieces of classic American period furniture, spanning the major ... read more
    Source: The Eaton County WoodworkerPublished on 2018-02-21
  • Now in the Store: ‘Ingenious Mechanicks’
    You can now place a pre-publication order for “Ingenious Mechanicks: Early Workbenches & Workholding” in our store. The price is $39, which includes domestic shipping. All customers who place a pre-publication order will receive a free download of the book in pdf format at checkout. The book is scheduled to ship in early April 2018. We don’t know which retailers will opt to carry the book (we hope all of them will). But we will update you here when we ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-02-21
  • Light Bulbs
    When I took my first class at Marc Adams’ School of Woodworking I had no idea that someday I would be working there. The place has been called “Disney World for Woodworkers” for several reasons, but what is it like to work there? Well so far, I’ve changed a lot of light bulbs. We’ve been in the process of converting all of the T8 fluorescent bulbs to LED’s. And in case you didn’t catch it the first time, there ... read more
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2018-02-21
  • Inside ‘er Information
    There has been a recent surge (if two emails in the same week qualifies as a surge) of enquiries regarding the appropriateness of ‘finishing’ (in the modern tongue, applying some sort of varnish or lacquer) the interiors of drawers and … Continue reading ... read more
    Source: Pegs and ‘TailsPublished on 2018-02-20
  • You see… the thing is….
    Contrary to popular belief, I haven't died. I haven't been lost at sea. I haven't yet been put in jail. I've just been busy... life has gotten a touch in the way of woodworking for me. We have a toddler now. She's almost two. I always said I didn't want kids, but boy was I wrong. Her name is Abigail and every day she amazes me. It would be unfair to blame her for my woodworking ... read more
    Source: The Eaton County WoodworkerPublished on 2018-02-20
  • For what it’s worth…
    I’ve never liked the Oxford comma. ... read more
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2018-02-20
  • Ash splint backpack video
    If you enjoyed 'My father's tools', settle down for another wonderful film about weaving ash splint baskets. Continue reading ... read more
    Source: Steve Tomlin CraftsPublished on 2018-02-20